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Why The Black Ribbon?

Melanoma means "black tumor"

Black is the color of the warrior's mood when going into battle and the melanoma
patient is in the battle for life

Black is our rage when we consider the lack of progress and lack of research funding going on after 25 years of the so-called "War On Cancer"

Badges!

Cancer survivor,melanoma and other cancer pin ons and magnetic badges. This and others are
Available Now!

Badge shown is actual size.
All badges are 2 1/4 in. diameter
Inspiration badges are now available

 

New! Magnetic ribbons.
Support Cancer Research



Consider these excerpts from the book "Saving Your Skin" by Dr. Barney Kenet and Patricia Lawler. This book was published in 1994. You can find out more about this book on-line at amazon.com.

The Statistics of Melanoma

Today there are 300,000 people in the United States who have had or are now afflicted with melanoma. Consider these statistics:

Melanoma is the most frequent cancer among women aged 25 to 29, and the second most frequent (after breast cancer ) among women aged 30 to 34.

In 1993, approximately 32,000 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma and 6,800 will die of it.

Melanoma is now the seventh most common type of cancer in the U.S., and may become as common as colon cancer (presently the third most common malignancy) if steps are not taken to control it.

The death rate from melanoma has tripled in the past four decades.

Twenty-five percent of melanoma cases occur in people 39 years old or younger.

Although the United States' population increased ten percent from 1980 to 1987, the number of melanomas increased 83 percent.

Researchers at the New York University Melanoma Cooperative Group report that the lifetime risk of contracting melanoma in 1980 was one in 250; by the year 2000 the risk is predicted to climb to one in 75. Compare that with 1935, when the lifetime risk of melanoma was only one in 1,500. The N.Y.U. group further documents dramatic increases in melanoma in particular parts of the country. For example, there was a 340 percent increase in risk between 1969 and 1978 for Caucasians living in southern Arizona. While other types of cancer - such as breast, lung, and prostate cancer - occur with greater frequency, melanoma demands close attention. It strikes and kills young to middle-aged people. On average, for each death from melanoma, more than 17 years of potential life before age 65 are lost.




That book was published in 1994 and the projections given in it are becoming true. In 1997 malignant melanoma accounts for nearly 1% of all cancer deaths. In 2001 over 51,00 Americans will have developed melanoma and over 7300 will die of the disease. That's about 1 death per hour.
Worldwide, the incidence of melanoma is increasing at a faster rate than any other form of cancer, with the possible exception of lung cancer in women.
What Can You and I Do? We can make people aware. How do we do that? We can educate ourselves, spread the word, wear the black ribbon and demand more research dollars for a melanoma cure.



Due to the high demand and postal rates I can no longer send the black ribbon at my expense. Email requests received prior to and including Oct 1, 2001 will be honored. If you wish a black ribbon please send your request along with a SASE to:

Black Ribbon
P.O. Box 426
Lone Rock, WI 53556

Do NOT request more than 2 ribbons.

You can make your own or I will send you a ribbon, just send me a self addressed, stamped envelope asking for it. The ribbons are free.
I will include a Black Ribbon trifold brochure.

Be sure the SASE is business size (4 1/8" x 9 1/2")

If you live outside the United States, be sure the SASE has US postage as follows:
Canada and Mexico $0.60
All others outside the US: $0.80

You can donate to the Black Ribbon Campaign through PayPal
Your donation is not tax deductible

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For Information, Resources, and MEL-L Information Go To:
Mike's Page-The Melanoma Resource Center


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